Spicheren Giffertwald
The dense and steep Giffertwald presented the attacking Prussian Army a several challenge during the Battle of Spicheren in the Franco – Prussian War of 1870. This section, near the monument to the Grenadier – Regiment Prinz Carl von Preussen (shown on the right), is typical of the terrain.
Brandenburg Monument (detail)
This stone plaque is affixed to the monument to the 12th Brandenburg Regiment near the Giffertwald at Spicheren.
Gorze Monuments
Two Prussian Army monuments stand along the roadway north of Gorze where the Prussian attack during the Battle of Mars-la-Tour was stopped by concentrated French rifle and machine-gun fire.
Mars-la-Tour Monument (detail)
The major French monument to the Battle of Mars-la-Tour stands rather forlornly below a highway bridge. This bronze relief on the side of the monument depicts the dramatic cavalry engagement near Mars-la-Tour.
Gravelotte Valley of Death
The Metz – Verdun road crosses the Mance Ravine which was heavily defended by French entrenchments. Repeated attempts to cross the ravine ended in slaughter of the attacking Prussian troops and led King Wilhelm of Prussia to believe that the battle had been lost.
Sedan Citadelle
The stout walls of the medieval citadel of Sedan actually played little part in the Battle of Sedan in 1870. It now houses a museum dedicated to the citadel’s history.
Sedan Battlefield
Now mostly urban, the Sedan battlefield as seen from the Marfée Heights across the river. The citadel is visible in the middle distance and the expansive Bois de la Garenne in the far distance.
Maison de la Dernière Cartouche
The Museum of the House of the Last Cartridge in Bazeilles still retains its bullet scared façade.
Sedan Maison du Tisserands
The ‘Weaver’s Cottage’ where Otto von Bismarck and Napoleon III met after the French defeat in the Battle of Sedan, 1870.
Bazeilles War Memorial
The obelisk in Bazeilles commemorates the dead of the defense of this key approach into the city during the Battle of Sedan.
Donchéry Bridge
Used in 1870 by Prussian troops to move against Sedan from left to right; the same bridge was attacked from the right by the German 2nd Panzer Division during the Second World War’s Battle of Sedan in 1940.
Reichshoffen Monument
Monument erected in 1970 to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the desperate charge of four regiments of Cuirassiers under the command of General de Division de Bonnemains. Unsuccessful against Prussian infantry sheltered among the area’s walls and fences, the cuirassiers suffered heavy casualties to no benefit.
Reichshoffen Monument
Steps rising to the 1970 monument to the charge of General de Bonnemains’ Cuirassiers which occurred during the Battle of Woerth - Froeschwiller on 6 August 1870. The French Army of General MacMahon retreated through Reichshoffen.
Kaiser Wilhelm I Memorial
Entrance to Kaiser Wilhelm I Memorial to the victory at the Battle of Woerth; the memorial has since been destroyed.
Kaiser Wilhelm I Memorial
Overgrown and destroyed Kaiser Wilhelm I Memorial dedicated to the Battle of Woerth.
Woerth
La Sauer (Sauerbach) River as it flows through the village of Woerth; on 6 August, rains had swollen it beyond its banks.
Bavarian Monument in Woerth
A monument to Bavarians killed during the 1870 Franco-Prussian War stands in a highway intersection and short distance from the Centre Ville of Woerth.
Bavarian Monument in Woerth (detail)
Winged statue of victory hold the laurel wreath above the head of a dying Prussian soldier. (photo digitally lightened)
Bavarian Monument Plaques
Plaques from front of Bavarian Monument in Woerth showing the engagements on the Bavarian forces during the Franco-Prussian War.
Woerth Battlefield
View over the battlefield between Woerth and Froeschwiller; church steeple marks village of Froeschwiller. The Prussians fought from east to west (right to left) up this meadow valley against intense French Chassepot rifle fire.
French Battlefield Memorial
The main French monument to units that engaged the Prussian Army during the Battle of Woerth - Froeschwiller on 6 August 1870 is on the road from Woerth towards Elsasshausen.
Hessian Artillery Monument
Tower on a ridge near Elsasshausen is dedicated to the Hessian Field Artillery Regiment No. 11; the observation level provides views over the Woerth - Froeschwiller battlefield.
French Battlefield Memorial
French monument near Elsasshausen to the regiments of Turcos and Zouaves that engaged the Prussian Army during the Battle of Woerth - Froeschwiller on 6 August 1870. The areas outlined in white stone to the right are common mass graves of those who died in the fighting. The Zouaves alone accounted for 1,775 (80%) casualties.
Hessian Artillery Monument (detail)
Cannon barrels incorporated into the supports for the Hessian Artillery Monument near Elsasshausen.
Woerth Battlefield
View from the Hessian Artillery Monument as clouds form over the battlefield between Woerth and Froeschwiller; church steeple marks village of Froeschwiller. The Prussian Third Army attacked from these heights towards Froeschwiller and up the wide valley from right to left.
Village of Woerth
View of Woerth, site of Battle of Woerth - Froeschwiller during the Franco-Prussian War on 6 August 1870.
Prussian Officer’s Grave
Grave marker of Erwin von Heineccius, Nassau Infantry Regitment No 88 88 and Commandiert als Generalstabsoffizier Generalkommando XI Armee CorpsXI Army Corps staff officer; near Elsasshausen.
French Officers’ Graves
The lone graves of two French officers stand in the fields west of Elsasshausen; they died during the Battle of Woerth - Froeschwiller on 6 August 1870. Capitaine Leonard d’Eggs (rear) and Commandant Freund, both of the 4th Regiment of Cuirassiers.
Prussian unit Monument
The nearly overgrown monument to the Thuringian and Saxon troops.
Hessian Infantry Monument
The Prussian lion trods a defeated French banner and drum on a monument dedicated to the bloody struggle of the 3rd Kurhessian Infantry Regiment No 83.
Hessian Infantry Monument (detail)
The lion monument sits upon the crest of Elsasshausen ridge.
Froeschwiller Battlefield
Looking east across the wide valley meadow towards Woerth from the summit of the ridge south of Froeschwiller. The dramatic losses of the French and Prussian armies occurred in this now bucolic site.
French Graves near Froeschwiller
The road approaching Froeschwiller is lined with the graves of French and German officers killed in the battle of Woerth - Froeschwiller. Colonel Henri de Lacarre (right); Oberlieutenant Wilhelm Neuffer, Premier-Lieutenant Hans von Beeren, and Oberlieutenant Oscar Schussler (left).
Wurttemberg Monument
The ornate and well-preserved monument to the 3rd Wurttemberg Jager Battalion stands at the southern entrance of the farming village of Froeschwiller.
Wurttemberg Monument (front)
The front and plaque on the Wurttemberg Jager Monument stands at the summit of the ridge leading to Froeschwiller.
Wurttemberg Monument (detail)
The emblem of the 3rd Wurttemberg Jager Battalion from the monument near Froeschwiller.
Froeschwiller
Buildings along the main street of the sleepy village of Froeschwiller look remarkably unchanged from their late 19th century appearance. However, during the Battle of Woerth - Froeschwiller many of the buildings were destroyed by Prussian Army shelling.
Buildings in Froeschwiller
Two structures in Froeschwiller that retain their rural Alsace appearance.
Château in Froeschwiller
The 1891 Château in Froeschwiller antedates the battle, but presents a beautiful impression of late 19th century ‘country squire’ living.
Froeschwiller Barn
Old brick barn in Froeschwiller may have witnessed the panicked retreat and destruction of General Raoult’s Division.
Froeschwiller
A view of the main street in Froeschwiller from in front of the church and along the road towards Woerth.
West Prussian Monument
The monument to the West Prussian Grenadier Regiment No 6 sits at the crest of the ridge along the Froeschwiller – Woerth Road.
West Prussian Monument (plaque)
The plaque on the West Prussian Grenadier Monument states that the unit’s losses were 320 killed and 586 wounded in the Battle of Woerth - Froeschwiller and almost 1,500 casualties in the war.
West Prussian Monument (detail)
The urn ornamentation atop the West Prussian Grenadier Regiment No 6 Monument shows some vandalism.
West Prussian Monument
A full frontal view of the monument to the West Prussian Grenadier Regiment No 6 shows the vandalized memorial plaque (center, middle) but other detail remains undamaged.
French Replacement Monument
The German occupiers of 1941 were not above destroying monument to French units which fought in the Battle of Woerth - Froeschwiller, as this small monument records the destruction of a larger one originally erected in 1875. Note the slope of the ridge behind the monument as it drops towards Woerth.
Franco-Prussian War Graves
The ridge above Woerth is dotted with common mass graves of Franco-Prussian War dead.
Hessian Artillery Monument
The Hessian Artillery Monument stands upon the Elsasshausen ridge as seen across the battlefield from the Woerth - Froeschwiller road.
Woerth-Froeschwiller Road
The road from Woerth (in distance) demonstrates the steepness of the ridge which the Prussian Army struggled to attain against accurate and intense French Chassepot fire. Only Prussian massive artillery fire and flanking movements through the forest gave the Prussians the victory.
Nassau Monument
Near the Niederwald, through which they moved to assault the French right flank, stands a monument to 2nd Nassau Infantry Regiment No 88.
Hessian Jager Monument
The Hessian Jager Battalion No 11 Monument with the Niederwald in the background.
Common Soldiers’ Grave
In a field at the edge of a small copse south of the Niederwald is the common grave of 269 French and German soldiers, killed on 6 August 1870 during the Battle of Woerth - Froeschwiller.
Common Soldiers’ Grave
Soldiers’ mass grave along D250 south of Niederwald.
Thuringian Monument
The 6th Thuringian Infantry Regiment No 95 stands among mature trees, no doubt 140 years old. In the distance, Mont de Gunstett is visible.
Thuringian Monument (detail)
Statue atop the monument to the 6th Thuringian Infantry Regiment No 95 depicts a woman holding a flag with streamers.
French Army Monument
Monument to French units which engaged in the Battle of Woerth - Froeschwiller on 6 August 1870. Detail photos show numerous ‘bullet holes’.
French Army Monument (top)
Monument to French units which engaged in the Battle of Woerth - Froeschwiller on 6 August 1870.
French Army Monument (detail)
Monument to French units which engaged in the Battle of Woerth - Froeschwiller on 6 August 1870.
French Army Monument (side 1)
Monument to French units which engaged in the Battle of Woerth - Froeschwiller on 6 August 1870.
French Army Monument (side 2)
Monument to French units which engaged in the Battle of Woerth - Froeschwiller on 6 August 1870.
French Army Monument (side 3)
Monument to French units which engaged in the Battle of Woerth - Froeschwiller on 6 August 1870.
French Army Monument (side 4)
Monument to French units which engaged in the Battle of Woerth - Froeschwiller on 6 August 1870.