Quettehou Église
The Église St-Vigor in Quettehou where King Edward III elevated numerous followers to knighthood shortly after landing in France in 1346.
Quettehou Église Plaque
Stone plaque in the church of St-Vigor in Quettehou commemorating the knighthood of the named individuals by Edward III including his son, the Prince Noir, or Black Prince.
Somme Crossing
The location of Edward III’s crossing of the Somme River at Petit Pont, then known as Blanché taque.
Crécy Cross of Bohême
An ancient medieval cross stands upon a modern plinth marking the alleged location of the death of blind King John of Bohemia. King John rode against the English in the Battle of Crécy, 1346.
Crécy Observation Tower
The modern observation tower occupies the spot where English King Edward III climbed a windmill to observe the Battle of Crécy in 1346.
Crécy Battlefield
The hill up which French knights charged against the withering fire of English longbow men. The observation tower on the summit occupies the location of King Edward III’s observation windmill. The slight ridgeline on the left probably offered the Black Prince’s troops some flank protection.
The Burghers of Calais
The famous statue by Auguste Rodin presents the starving leaders of besieged Calais offering themselves to King Edward III in return for the safe passage of the town’s citizens.
Somme Crossing at Béthencourt
The Somme River near the village of Béthencourt where it is probably that Henry IV finally managed to outmaneuver French forces in 1415 before the Battle of Agincourt.
Agincourt English Positions
The plowed field at Agincourt where the English formed their first position during the Battle of Agincourt in 1415 looks much the same today as it did 600 years ago. The soil retains its slippery, gooey texture that hampered French efforts at the time.
Agincourt Memorials
These roadside memorials are behind the English positions at Agincourt.
Azincourt Centre Historique Médiéval
The entrance to the Azincourt Museum is shaped to simulate arrow drawn English longbows, such as those which devastated French forces during the Battle of Agincourt, 1415.
Rouen Place le Bucher
The Place le Bucher in Rouen where Jeanne d’Arc was burned at the stake.
Jargeau Jeanne d’Arc
Statue of Jeanne d’Arc in Jargeau, commemorating her victory here over English forces in 1429.
Domrémy Jeanne d’Arc Birthplace
This modest house in Domrémy was the birthplace of Jeanne d’Arc in 1412.
Crotoy Jeanne d’Arc
The Jeanne d’Arc statue in Crotoy where she was held after her capture by English forces. Eventually she was moved to Rouen where she was executed. The statue is unusual in that it depicts her as a small girl without the customary military clothing.
Compiègne Jeanne d’Arc
In the center of Compiègne is this statue of Jeanne d’Arc. She was captured outside the city walls when a detachment of French soldiers that she was leading encountered a much large Burgundian force. During their retreat, the city gates were closed before she could re-enter.
Beaurevoir Tour Jeanne d’Arc
The tower near Beaurevoir where Jeanne d’Arc was allegedly held captive by John of Luxemburg before her sale to the English.
Orléans Jeanne d’Arc
The equestrian statue of Jeanne d’Arc in the Place Martri in Orléans. The liberated the city from an English siege, scoring her first military victory.
Poitier Battlefield
The stream that formed a portion of the battlefield at Poitiers where the Black Prince defeated and captured the French King John II in 1356.
Chavigny
The walls and dwellings of the medieval village of Chavigny stand on a hilltop.
Vallée aux Clercs
The Moulin Edward III overlooks the Crecy battlefield from all perspectives in the valley. The north/south running depression is called Vallée aux Clercs. The valley is flanked on both sides by rolling hills that rise 50 to 70 meters in height marked by rideaux, steep drops of two to five meters.
Lanterne des Morts
The brick Lanterne des Morts in Crecy is believed to date from the end of 13th century and was erected by Edward I, king of England, in posthumous homage to its wife Eleonore de Castile, countess of Ponthieu.
Monument Jean de Luxembourg
In the center of the place Jean de Luxembourg stands a black stone memorial ‘To Jean de Luxembourg, King of Bohemia and all his comrades in arms, dead for France at Crecy 26 August 1346.’
Le Crotoy Harbor
King Edward III sought to be resupplied through the harbor at Le Crotoy. No supply ships arrived and they burned the town. The smoke was visible to King Philip VI in Abbeville.
Noyelles-s/Mer Chinese Cemetery
Noyelles was a base for the British Army's Chinese Labor Corps during the First World War. This evokative and mysterious CWGC cemetery sits in an open plain near Nolette and holds 841 burials from these hospital and burial workers.
Ferme de Drugy
Jeanne d’Arc was held captive for a period of time during 1430 in these old farm buildings near St-Riquier as she awaited her transfer to English hands in Rouen.
St-Riquier: Abbaye interior
The arcade, stringcourse, and tracery decorate the Benedictine Abbey in St-Riquier.
St-Riquier: Abbaye Tower
St-Riquier has been a monastic city since 625 and was the capital of Ponthieu until the ascendance of Abbeville in the 11th century. Parts of the Benedictine Abbey church dates from the 12th century.
St-Riquier Belffroi
St-Riquier's original 13th century bell tower was destroyed in 1475. This replacement dates from 1528. A white plaque on the side of the tower commemorates the 500th anniversary of Jeanne d'Arc's captivity in the town in 1430 on her way to her trial in Rouen.
Abbaye de Valloires
The Cistercian Abbaye de Valloires was founded in the 12th century; totally destroyed during the Hundred Years War and again in the Thirty Years War (1618 – 1648). The current structure was rebuilt in the 18th century. The abbey is now more famous for its extensive gardens, which are open to the public for a slight fee, but worth the visit.
l’ Église de la Nativite de la Vierge
This small country Église de la Nativite de la Vierge in Forest-l'Abbaye presents a Romanesque choir dating from between 1160 and 1175. The Gothic-style nave, which was added sometime later, was destroyed during the Thirty Year War and rebuilted in its current form in 1635. It has recently completely restored.
Le Crotoy Château du Crotoy
The Chateau du Crotoy was constructed in 1150 by the Count de Ponthieu and destroyed in 1674 under the terms of the treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle (Aachen), which ended a war between France and Spain. In this fortress Jeanne d’Arc was imprisoned from 21 November to 20 December 1430. She was turned over to the English on 8 December and later transported to Rouen for her trial and execution. The white plaque commemroates Jeanne's stay here.
Cathédrale Sainte-Croix d’Orléans
The interior nave of the Cathédrale Sainte-Croix d’Orléans is shown decorated to celebrate the liberation of the city by Jeanne d'Arc. The church's north transept holds a statue of Jeanne; the altar is carved with battle scenes from her life; and stained glass windows depict events from her life. Memorial plaques commemorate the British and American soldiers who died in the world wars to liberate France.
Beaugency Clock Tower
The tower stands above an 11th century gate in the old Beaugency city walls. The clock dates from the 16th century. The gate provides a beautiful entrance into the old town which still presents numerous examples of half-timbered houses and stone medieval structures.
Notre-Dame de Beaugency
The 12th century Augustine abbey church in Beaugency hosted church councils in 1104 and 1152, demonstrating its importance within the medieval Catholic Church. The marriage of Eléonore of Aquitaine was annulled by a council here in 1152, eventually creating the dynastic conflict of the Hundred Years War. The interior was destroyed by fire during the Religious Wars in 1567 and never fully recovered. The structural elements remain intact including its heavy round nave pillars.
Statue of Jeanne d'Arc in Beaugency
The tree-shaded park in the place St-Firmin in Beaugency holds a statue of the victorious Jeanne d’Arc with her sword in one hand and flag staff in the other. Her forces recaptured the city from the English on 18 June 1429.
Beaugency: Tour Cesar
The square Tour Cesar is a remnant of the 11th century castle in Beaugency and was incorporated into the Château Dunois. Dunois was one of Jeanne d'Arc’s military commanders. The interior and roof were destroyed in 1567 during the Religious Wars and have not since been replaced.
Beaugency: Tour du Diable (Devil's Tower)
This cylindrical stone Tour du Diable (Devil's Tower) is a remaining fragment of Beaugency city walls built in the 11th and 12th centuries. It protected the nearby port and Pont de Beaugency.
Château de Meung-sur-Loire
The rather dilapidated Château dates from the 12th century and was the home of the Bishops of Orléans from that time until the French Revolution. The English retreated to Meung after the siege of Orléans and John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury established his headquarters in the chateau. Although Jeanne d’Arc captured the bridge on 15 June 1429, she by-passed the chateau to pursue an attack upon Beaugency. The English abandoned the city on 18 June 1429. The chateau was transformed from a defensive bastion to its current manor house form in the early 18th century.
Orléans: Collégiale St-Pierre-le-Puellier
A Romanesque Collégiale St-Pierre-le-Puellier, built in the 12th century, is the oldest remaining church in Orléans and one of the few medieval churches to survive the Religious Wars and World Wars. It reportedly counted Jeanne d'Arc’s mother as a parishioner. Today it is a cultural center.
Meung-s/Loire: Collégiale St-Liphard
The rather dilapidated Chateau dates from the 12th century and was the home of the Bishops of Orléans from that time until the French Revolution. The English retreated to Meung after the siege of Orléans and John Talbot, 1st Earl of Shrewsbury established his headquarters in the chateau. Although Jeanne d’Arc captured the bridge on 15 June 1429, she by-passed the chateau to pursue an attack upon Beaugency. The English abandoned the city on 18 June 1429. The chateau was transformed from a defensive bastion to its current manor house form in the early 18th century.
Orléans: Location of Medieval Fort Tourelles
The small overlook, which provides views back towards Orléans was the location of the Fort de Tourelles, the strongest of the English positions. Its capture took place after a thirteen hour battle during which Jeanne was wounded by an arrow in the shoulder and the leaders of the local English defense were killed, thus breaking the siege.
Orléans: Hôtel Groslot
The red brick building, which was constructed in the 16th century, was once a residence of French kings and later the Hôtel de Ville of Orléans. Another Jeanne d’Arc statue, this time wearing a dress, is in front of its main outdoor staircase. There is a lovely park behind the building, which contains, as decoration, the façade of the 15th century St-Jacques Chapelle.
La Croix Faron
The cross was erected in the 12th century to honor of Écuyer Faron who gave his life for his liege lord; however, as with many roadside shrines in this region, it has been rededicated to Jeanne d’Arc. It this case it purports to locate where Jeanne’s army fell upon the English rear guard on 18 June 1429 in what became the Battle of Patay.
Lingerolles: Moulin
The modern replacement for Lingerolles's medieval windmill is upon the hill of La Garenne. The English main position in the Baattle of Patay was established in a line anchored on the hill and extending to the northeast. They were routed by the French cavalry; the English survivors scattered in all directions to be hunted down and killed.
Orléans: Maison de Jeanne d'Arc
Jeanne frequently stayed in the home of Jacques Boucher, treasurer for the Duc d’Orléans. The structure was built into the western wall of the city. The original building was destroyed during the Second World War; the slightly smaller reconstruction houses the Maison de Jeanne d'Arc, which presents events from Jeanne’s life.
Jargeau: Medieval Gate
An old stone wall behind Jargeau's war memorial holds a plaque commemorating the 500th anniversary of Jeanne d’Arc’s assault upon these ramparts on 12 June 1429 during which she was knocked to the ground by a large stone projectile. She recaptured the city from the English garrison, many of whom were slaughtered during and after the fighting.
Orléans: Beffroi
The bell tower of the old Hôtel de Ville in Orleans was built in 1445; the large clock was installed eight years later. It can best be viewed from the place de République.
Cathédrale Sainte-Croix d’Orléans
There has been a church on this spot since the 7th century. After the original was destroyed by fire, Hugh Capet ordered construction of a great cathedral in 989. The Cathédrale Sainte-Croix d’Orléans is the fifth structure to stand here, a reconstruction of the one bombed during the Second World War. The façade is most impressive with three rose windows, five portals and two square towers.
Orléans: Hôtel des Créneaux
Hôtel des Créneaux was built upon the site of medieval fortifications and became the first town hall of Orléans in 1427. Its architecture is a mix of Gothic and Renaissance.
Patay: Église St-Andre
Originally the site of a 7th century Benedictine Abbey, the current Romanesque Église St-Andre was constructed during the 13th and 15th centuries. Jeanne d’Arc came here to pray after the victory of the Battle of Patay. The church was burnt during the Religious Wars and later restored. Four stained glass windows were destroyed by the nearby explosion of an ammunition train in August 1944.
Patay: Église St-Andre
Originally the site of a 7th century Benedictine Abbey, the current Romanesque Église St-Andre in Patay was constructed during the 13th and 15th centuries. Jeanne d’Arc came here to pray after the victory of the Battle of Patay. The church was burnt during the Religious Wars and later restored. Four stained glass windows were destroyed by the nearby explosion of an ammunition train in August 1944.
Beaugency: Pont de Beaugency
The twenty-six-arch 13th century Pont de Beaugency across the Loire is a beautiful example of the stone mason’s art. The differing colored stone work is the result of repairs of damage inflicted by numerous wars and natural disasters.
Orléans: Pont Georges V
The medieval Pont des Tourelles in Orleans across the Loire was not here but rather approximately 100m to the east. The current structure was completed in 1760 and named after France’s First World War ally, British king George V.
Orléans: Quai du Fort Tourelles
The small park, which locates the approach to Fort de Tourelles in Orléans, holds another statue to Jeanne d’Arc, this one erected in the 19th century to replace one destroyed in the 16th century religious wars.
Orléans: Bastille des Augustins
A small, cross-topped column identifies this intersection as the location of the Bastille (or siege-work) des Augustins in Orléans, whose capture by the French on 6 May forced the English to retreat into the Tourelle strongpoint.
Orléans: Tour Blanche
The tower is the last remaining element of the medieval fortress of Orleans and marks the eastern boundary of the fortifications. From here, French cannon bombarded the Tour de Tourelles across the river. While the foundation dates from the 4th century, the upper floors were added in the 14th and 15th centuries. A good view can be had from the nearby rue de la Tour Neuve one street to the east.
Compiègne: Statue of Jeanne d'Arc
In the main square in front of the Hôtel de Ville in Compiegne is a statue to Jeanne d’Arc erected in 1895 to commemorate the 450th anniversary of her death. It depicts her walking into battle holding Jeanne’s traditional white battle standard.
Compiègne: Hôtel de Ville
The late Gothic design Hôtel de Ville in Compiègne was built between 1498 and 1530 – well after Jeanne d'Arc’s death, but still a splendid example of the architecture of this period. The equestrian statue in the center of the structure is of Louis XII, who ruled France from 1462 to 1515. There are six stone statues on the façade and the fourth from the left is Jeanne d’Arc. At the very top of the central tower is one of the oldest clocks in France. The three figures, known as ‘Picantins,’ strike the hours with their hammers. The town’s tourist office is on the place de l’Hôtel de Ville.
Compiègne: Royal Palace
The current neo-classical Château de Compiègne, which dates from the 18th century, was built on the site of Charles V’s palace (1374), although earlier structures on the site could date as far back as the Merovingian king, Clovis. The location was chosen due to the proximity of hunting in the extensive Bois de Compiègne. Along with Versailles and Fontainebleau, it was one of the three seats of the royal government. The château now holds three museums: the royal apartments, Museum of the Second Empire, and National Automobile Museum.
Compiègne: Cloître de l’Ancienne Abbaye of Saint Corneille
The Royal Abbey of Saint Corneille in Compiègne, sering as the abbey to the Imperial Chapel, was founded in 876 by Charles the Bald, who wished in imitate the palace of his grandfather, Charlemagne in Aix-la-Chapelle (now Aachen, Germany). As such, many royal personages were crowned or buried there. It is located on the site of an even older Merovingian palace. Although the abbey’s influence waned in the 10th century and it was taken over by Benedictine monks in 1150, it remained a location of homage to great events. The entire complex was desecrated and looted during the French revolution and Nazi bombing in 1940 completed its destruction.
Compiègne: Tour of Jeanne d'Arc
Tour of Jeanne d’Arc, also known as Tour Beauregard, is the remains of a 12th century royal donjon, which was part of the castle defense for the medieval bridge over the Oise River in Compiègne. A stone plaque commemorates the 500th anniversary of Jeanne’s capture.
Compiègne: Église St-Jacques
Pope Innocent III authorized the building of Compiègne's Église St-Jacques in 1198 as a stop on the pilgrimage route of Santiago de Compostela. However, construction didn’t begin until during the reign of St-Louis in 1235 with the building of the choir and transept. It is said that Jeanne came here to pray on the morning of her capture and the south aisle holds a statue of her executed by Marie d’Orléans, daughter of King Louis-Philippe.
Compiègne: Église St-Jacques
Église St. Jacques in Compiègne has attractive stained glass window to Jeanne depicting her kneeling and receiving Communion in the church. Other windows show to St-Louis welcoming the first patient at the Hôtel-Dieu St-Nicolas and the arrival of Shroud of Turin to the church. The stonework of the clerestory is notable.
Abbey de Nouaille Fortified Gate
The fortified gate provides entrance into the grounds of the Abbey de Nouaille where the army of Edward, The Black Prince, sheltered before the Battle of Poitiers.
Abbey de Nouaille Fortified North Tower
Battle of Poitiers: The north tower of the fortified walls surrounding the Abbey de Nouaille stands above the bridge over the moat.
Abbey de Nouaille Fortified South Tower
Battle of Poitiers: The south tower of the fortified walls of the Abbey de Nouaille remains adjacent to the moat.
Abbey de Nouaille
Battle of Poitiers: View of the Abbey de Nouaille from the highway viewpoint shows the fortified walls, north tower, and the abbey church in all their glory. The current abbey structure dates from the 12th century, although the presence of a religious institution on this ground dates from the 7th century. The Black Prince, son of Edward III, spent a night before the battle in the abbey. The forest behind the abbey is the Bois de Nouaille; the Battle of Poitiers occurred on land on the opposite side of the forest.
Poitiers Battlefield 2
View of a segment of the Poitiers battlefield that stretched across the front of the Earl of Warwick's final position. Much of the battlefield is now occupied by modern homes, but this open field remains untouched.
Longbow Hedges
In the Battle of Poitiers the English longbowmen hid in a line of thick hedges that provided them protection from attacking dismounted French knights, but allowed them to mass their arrows upon the enemy. The hedge stood in front of the English 'battle' or division, commanded by the Earl of Salisbury on the north (right) flank of the English line.
Ford at Gue de l'Homme
Before the Battle of Poitiers commenced, the Earl of Warwick was withdrawing his men across this ford. Upon seeing the action, the French attacked sending their vanguard commanded by Marschal d'Audrehem against Warwick. Warwick's men killed Audrehem and his small group and returned north to anchor the English left flank.
Poitiers Battlefield 3
One of five Battle of Poitiers infomational signs located where Warwick engaged Marschal d'Audrehem's vanguard. The depressed ground before the infosign holds a large scale map of the France at the time of the battle.
Rouen: Aitre St-Maclou detail
A medieval courtyard and parish cemetery is now occupied by Rouen's Ecole des Beaux-Arts. It was used as a mass grave during the plaque. The building’s wooden trim displays numerous skulls, bones, grave-digging tools, and other depictions of is macabre past.
Rouen: Aitre St-Maclou
A medieval courtyard and parish cemetery is now occupied by Rouen's Ecole des Beaux-Arts. It was used as a mass grave during the plaque. The building’s wooden trim displays numerous skulls, bones, grave-digging tools, and other depictions of is macabre past.
Rouen: Episcopal Palace
Jeanne d'Arc's trial was held in the rooms of Rouen's Episcopal Palace. This ecclesiastical building, attached to the ambulatory of the cathedral, runs along the narrow, shadowed, cobblestone rue St-Romain. The enchanting street is lined with 15th to 18th century half-timbered houses and ends with a view of the spire of Eglise St-Maclou.
Rouen: Episcopal Palace Plaque
Although only glimpses of the Bishop’s Palace in Rouen are possible, a stone plaque identifies that Jeanne d'Arc was sentenced to death here on 29 May 1430.
Rouen: Jeanne d''Arc statue in Eglise Jeanne d'Arc
This stylized statue of Jeanne d'Arc is in the church that bears her name in Rouen's Vieux Marche.
Rouen: Jeanne d''Arc Statue in Vieux Marche
A statue of Jeanne d'Arc standing amid flames before the stake is in an alcove of the exterior walls of the Eglise Jeanne d'Arc in Rouen facing the place Vieux Marche where she was executed.
Rouen: Palais de Justice
In the late Middle Ages (1499) Rouen's Palais de Justice held the judicial and financial branches of Normandy administration. The Royal Palace was started in 1508. The central section presents dramatic dormers with pinnacled roofs. In 1976, during renovations, a Jewish monument, built about 1100, was discovered in a crypt under the building. It is known that, about that time, Rouen had a very large Jewish population and the building was in the heart of the Jewish quarter. Because it remains a courthouse, the interior and courtyard are closed for security reasons.
Rouen: Abbey St Ouen
On 24 May 1431 Jeanne d'Arc was brought to the cemetery of this church, tied to a scaffold, and threatened with immediate execution if she did not confess. She confessed to the sin of heresy and signed an oath to abandon men’s clothing. This action legally reduced her sentence from death to life imprisonment. Originally founded as a Benedictine Abbey in 750, the current St-Ouen is a beautiful Gothic structure built between the 14th and 16th centuries. The interior holds 80 stained glass windows.
Rouen: Cathedral interior
This is a view of the arcade, triforium, clerestory of Rouen Cathedral as viewed from the transept. A marble statue Jeanne d’Arc au Bucher (Joan of Arc on the stake) by Georges Saupique is above a the altar in the Chapel Jeanne d’Arc. There is also a statue of Jeanne holding a lance with the White banner.
Rouen: Cathedral Nave
There has been a church on this site in Rouen since the 4th century; over the centuries it has been enlarged, burned down, and rebuilt several times. Parts of the current Gothic structure date from the 12th century, but it was not completed until the 16th century and then in the Renaissance style. The building’s contents suffered from the Religious Wars of that century and again during the later French Revolution. Two rose windows were destroyed in Allied bombing of April 1944 and later bombing brought down the old North Tower. Nonetheless, it is an impressing edifice, although now encroached upon by city streets. The vaulted ceiling rises over 100 feet above the floor of the nave. The cathedral was the subject of a famous series of paintings by Claude Monet.
Plaque on the ruins of the Chateau du Crotoy
Jeanne d'Arc was transported by boat down the Somme and imprisoned in the Chateau du Crotoy’s Tour du Roi from 21 November to 20 December 1430. It was from here that she was transported to Rouen for her trial and execution.Only a small section of wall remains where a white plaque commemorates Jeanne's stay here.
Château-fortress of Philip Augustus in Rouen
In the Tour Jeanne d'Arc is this model of the Chateau Philippe-Augustus (also known as Bouvreuil) in Rouen.
Statue of Jeanne d'Arc, Beaulieu-les-Fontaines
A statue of the maiden stands on a short path off the rue Jeanne d’Arc west of Beaulieu-les-Fontaines. She is presented peacefully in civilian garb. The plinth is inscribed ‘First stage toward Rouen’.
Statue Jeanne d'Arc in Arras
The statue is in the courtyard of the Cathedrale Notre-Dame-et-Saint-Vaast d’Arras. Jeanne d'Arc is depicted draped in long tunic, arms outstretched pending resignation of execution with her eyes raised heavenward.
Lucheux: Belfry
One theory is that Jeanne d'Arc was held in the belfry in Arras, at that time one of the ancient city gates. In fact, the D5 highway still passes through the structure. The belfry is a listed UNESCO site and tours can be booked at the tourist office.
Château de Drugy
The Château de Drugy was built for the Abbot of St-Riquier in 1219, Jeanne was held in what is now a simple farmhouse outside the town of St-Riquier for one night. Her dreary prison cell was about 10 meters in diameter with a pointed ceiling 4 m high. The damp, dark room still exists and it is now used as a farm storage room.
Tour Jeanne d’Arc, Rouen
Jeanne arrived in Rouen on 24 December 1430 and she was imprisoned in the chateau-fortress of Philip Augustus, known as Bouvreuil. The chateau was a much more imposing work than what currently remains. Originally build upon the site of a Gallo-Roman Amphitheater at the edge of medieval Rouen, it had seven main towers connected by walls and enclosing an almost circular keep (see photo titles: Chateau-fortress of Philip Augustus in Rouen). The actual tower of Jeanne’s imprisonment was demolished in 1809 because of its dilapidated condition. The current Tour Jeanne d’Arc was actually the chateau’s donjon. Jeanne entered this tower only once, when she was threatened by her English captors with instruments of torture. The tower now houses a museum presenting a reconstruction of Jeanne’s imprisonment.
Chateau Tower, Beaulieu-les-Fontaines
Jeanne was brought to a fortress in Beaulieu on 27 May 1430. She was imprisoned on the first floor of one of the chateau’s eight towers. In a relatively benign captivity, she was allowed the company of several of her followers including her brother Pierre. Jeanne attempted an escape from captivity by locking her guards in the tower cell. She was recognized by the night patrol at a critical moment and the escape was foiled. Only one of the towers of the chateau complex remains in the center of Beaulieu. It stands guarding the gateway into the chateau complex.
Rouen: rue Etoupee
Jeanne d''Arc traveled south on the rue Etoupee in Rouen on her way to the Vieux Marche to be executed. The street presents numerous half-timbered structures, although it is thought that most date from the 16th century.
Rouen: Tomb of Richard Lionheart
Inside the Rouen Cathedral is the tomb of Richard the Lionheart, which contains only his heart; his other remains are buried in other parts of France. Other burials in the cathedral include Rollo, first Viking ruler of Normandy and Empress Matilda, granddaughter of William the Conqueror.
Basilique Bois-Chenu
The Basilique Bois-Chenu religious shrine, started in 1881, was originally dedicated to St-Michael, but after its completion after the First World War it was consecrated to Jeanne d’Arc. It sits about the valley of the Meuse River and can be seen from some distance, especially at night when it is illuminated. The crypt holds the statue of Notre-Dame de Bermont, the original statue before which Jeanne prayed in the chapel of that name. Several statues of Jeanne stand in front of the basilica.
Basilique Bois-Chenu Interior
The Basilique Bois-Chenu religious shrine, started in 1881, was originally dedicated to St-Michael, but after its completion after the First World War it was consecrated to Jeanne d’Arc. The walls of the nave hold six paintings (by Lionel Royer) depicting events in Jeanne’s life. One is shown on the left of this photo of the basilica interior.
Chapel de Bermont
The Chapel de Bermont, founded as a Benedictine abbey in the 11th century, stands upon a wooded plateau between Domrémy and Vaucouleurs. Jeanne d’Arc frequently came here to pray and legend has it that she witnessed apparitions of St-Catherine of Alexandria, Margaret of Antioch and St-Michael the Archangel in the surrounding woods. The chapel was spared by the invading Swedish Army during the Thirty Years War but did less well in the Revolution when the Hermitage and its grounds were nationalized and sold. In the mid-19th century, efforts to develop the site as a shrine to Jeanne d’Arc eventually were successful.
Jeanne d'Arc Birthplace
Jeanne d’Arc was born in 1412 as the Hundred Years War raged across France. The house in Domremy still stands. The simple, four-room farmhouse belonged to her father Jacques d’Arc. It was sold by the family in the 16th century, but efforts to preserve the site resulted in its repurchase by the state in 1818 and its declaration as a national monument. A replica of an armored, kneeling Jeanne has been placed in a niche above the front door.
Jeanne d'Arc Birthplace detail
Detail of the emblems above the entrance door to the birthplace of Jeanne d'Arc in Domremy.
Eglise St-Remi, Domremy
The Eglise St-Remi, Domremy, was substantially altered in 1824, and bears little resemblance to the modest structure of Jeanne’s time. Even the entrance door was moved to face to road from the side that faced the d’Arc home. Stained glass windows, representing events in Jeanne’s life were added in 1955 to replace those damaged in 1940. The semi-circular turret is believed to date from the 13th century.
Eglise St-Remi Interior, Domremy
Interior of the Eglise St-Remi in Domremy with the octagonal baptismal font that was used during Jeanne d'Arc’s baptism. The church is adorned with numerous religious artifacts including a fresco of the martyrdom of St-Sebastian (1586), a sculpture of Jeanne’s head as it appears at the moment of her death, a statue of St-Elophe carrying his own head from the 18th century (to right), and a statue of Jeanne in full armor.
Vaucouleurs
The equestrian statue of Jeanne d'Arc stands in the place de l’Hotel de Ville in Vaucouleurs, which also houses a small museum dedicated to her.
Porte de France, Chateau of Robert de Baudricourt, Vaucouleurs
In this chateau Jeanne d’Arc convinced the local military captain to seek an escort to the court of the Dauphine, which at that time was in Chinon. It was not until her third visit to Robert in February 1429 that he relented and granted her request. All that remains of the castle is the chapel crypt and the Porte de France, which was the entrance to the chateau and the city gate. The current chapel is a reconstruction from 1923.
Roman Arches, Grand
The town of Grand contains two remarkable archeological sites. The first is the Gallo-Roman amphitheater, which was capable of seating 17,000 spectators. The second is a Roman mosaic floor, which is one of the largest in Europe.
Roman Mosaic, Grand
The town of Grand contains two remarkable archeological sites. The first is the Gallo-Roman amphitheater, which was capable of seating 17,000 spectators. The second is a Roman mosaic floor, which is one of the largest in Europe.
Formigny Memorial
A glorious memorial to the two victors of the battle stands at the crossroads of the old Route Nationale (N13 now the D613) and the road to Formigny (Le Lieu Mabire or D517). Bronze statues of comte de Clermont and connetable de Richemont surmount a large stone platform. They are depicted in their armor standing under the lady of victory.
Formigny Memorial detail
Plaque on the Battle of Formigny Memorial depicting the arrival of Richemont to the battlefield. He watches the engagement in progress in the valley below from the hillside.
Chapelle St Louis
The simple chapel was constructed by Clermont in 1486 to commemorate his victory in the Battle of Formigny. Over the years it gradually fell into disuse and was further deteriorated during the Revolution. It was restored by the count of Paris and donated to the local community in 1963. It now houses a few relics of the battle, but, unfortunately, it is not generally open to the public.
Chapelle St Louis rear
This rear view of the Chapelle St Louis in Formigny shows the proximity of the stone bridge on the left. This small bridge over the stream stood behind the middle of the original English positions. As Richemont attacked the flank, the English curved their line back and to the south of this bridge, keeping it within their “L” formation.
Formigny Battlefield
The English line in the Battle of Formigny ran into the fields north and south of the marker. This was a generally lowland area in a small valley. The terrain offered the English little of the natural defensive features of other Hundred Years War battlefields such as Crecy.
Battle of Formigny Monument
A simple stone column flanked by tablets identifies the first English positions in the Battle of Formigny. The stone, erected in 1824, records the French victory and English loss of Normandy.
Chateau of William the Conqueror
The foundation stones of the Chateau of William the Conqueror in Caen. Constructed around 1060, the massive chateau stood in the center of the city. The Keep was destroyed by the Revolutionary government in 1793. Used as a barracks in 1944, it was severely bombed and never rebuilt. Several modern buildings have been constructed within its fortified walls to house museums.
Abbaye aux Hommes
This Romanesque Benedictine Abbey in the center of Caen was built as penance by William the Conqueror for his marriage to his cousin, Queen Matilda. The abbey church (right), dedicated to Saint-Etienne, housed the grave of the famous duke until destroyed during the Religious Wars. The abbey buildings (left) were modernized in the 18th century and now house municiple offices.
La Pernelle
The high promentory of la Pernelle has long been used as an observation point over the eastern Cotentin shore line. In the distance the curve of la Hougue can be recognized. The German observation cupola provided target information to batteries along the coastline during the Utah Beach invasion.
Carentan Street Arcade
This medieval arcade housed Carentan's marketplace in what is now the Place de la Republique.
Fort de la Hougue
Moat, wall, and guard post of the Fort de la Hougue near St-Vaast-la-Hougue. The Vauban designed fortifications were constructed in 1694 to guard the vulnerable east coast of the Cotenti Peninsula. Edward III landed his army near here in 1346.
Ile de Tatihou
This once fortified island of Tatihou in the bay of la Hougue guarded the port of St-Vaast-la-Hougue. The Vauban-designed watchtower is the tallest of its type.
Quettehou Plaque
A plaque in the Eglise st-Vigor in Quettehou commemorates the landing of King Edward III and his army in 1346. The king's son, the Prince of Wales, was knighted before this church's altar.
Eglise St-Vigor
The 11th century Eglise Sat-Vigor in Quettehou was the site of ceremonies held immediately after the landing of King Edward III's army in Sat-Vaast-la Hougue.
Tour de la Hougue
The Vauban inspired watchtower in the Fort de la Hougue was part of the defenses of the Cotentin shore line constructed in 1694. The taller adjacent tower sheltered the staircase to the cannon platform at the top.
Abbaye-aux-Hommes
This Romanesque Benedictine Abbaye-aux-Hommes in the center of Caen was built as penance by William the Conqueror for his marriage to his cousin, Queen Matilda. The abbey church shown in the distance in this rear view, was dedicated to Saint-Etienne and housed the grave of the famous duke until destroyed during the Religious Wars. The abbey buildings (right) were modernized in the 18th century and now house municiple offices.